Rabbit Control

Rabbit Trapping, Removal, and Prevention

Call us now at 1-888-488-1415 or contact us online.

Rabbit Control

If you have rabbits affecting your home, business, or exterior property you have come to the right place for professional help. We are professional rabbit trappers or wildlife control technicians. Our main line of work is to remove rabbits that enter into manmade structures. Some examples are: female rabbits that den up and bear young inside wall cavities, crawlspaces, or food facilities.

A rabbit may enter a wall or crawlspace and there bear young and store up food cashes. Rabbits dig under porches or buildings to bear their young, and sometimes die there causing tremendous odor problems and contaminating the inside of the building. Rabbits often will infest a building for years, causing the building to lose its value and creating health problems.

We use the most current rabbit traps, poisons, cleanup, and block out techniques. If you have a rabbit problem, contact us or give us a call to schedule professional coaching or our rabbit removal services.


General Rabbit Facts

RABBITS

Rabbits are long-eared, puffy-tailed animals that, surprisingly, are not members of the rodent family. Rabbits, or lagomorphs, are anywhere from 15 to 19 inches long and usually average between two to four pounds in weight. Some species of rabbits are strong swimmers, while others prefer dry land only. Jackrabbits and hares are different from the cottontail in that they are larger and have longer ears. Rabbits are easy prey for hunters as they are tasty and there are many of them. Rabbit fur is gray or brownish and molts two times every year. Their hind feet are very large and strong, giving rabbits that extra umph for their characteristic jumps.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q-1. Where do rabbits live?
Q-2. When are rabbits most active?
Q-3. What foods do rabbits eat?
Q-4. Why should I learn how to get rid of rabbits in my yard, fields or crops?
Q-5. I have a rabbit in my yard, fields or crops.  Will it cause any damage?
Q-6. I have a rabbit living in my car.  Will it cause any damage?
Q-7. I heard rabbits carry diseases.  Is that true?
Q-8. I heard insects live on rabbits.  Is that true?
Q-9. Will a rabbit hurt my dog or cat?
Q-10. I want to trap or kill a rabbit myself.  Is that OK?
Q-11. How can United Wildlife’s Rabbit Pest Control help me get rid of my rabbit problem?
Q-12. What are United Wildlife’s payment options for rabbit removal or to get rid of rabbits?
Q-13. What should I do after United Wildlife Animal Control removes the rabbits?
Q-1. WHERE DO RABBITS LIVE?
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A. Many species of rabbit live in most or all of the United States. Naturally, rabbits prefer cultivated, open or brushy areas, though some will live near deserts, marshes and swamps. Brush piles, field edges and landscaped back yards provide the perfect source of food and shelter for rabbits.

Most rabbits do not dig their own burrows, but will take advantage of a burrow already made by a woodchuck or other animal. Or, rabbits will live in existing natural cavities. Rabbits will live in underground dens in the harshest months of winter or to escape a predator.

A rabbit will build a “form” in the spring and fall months. A form is a nest-like cavity on the ground, usually made in tall weeds and grasses. It is a good place for the rabbit to hide from predators and nasty weather. When a female rabbit gives birth, she will usually do so in a form.

As humans build their homes and businesses closer and closer to natural rabbit habitat, the rabbits will take up residence near manmade living spaces. These locations are well-kept, cultivated and often surrounded by food sources for both male and female rabbits, young and old. Female rabbits, in particular, enjoy the safety of human areas. They must protect their babies from predators.

Q-2. WHEN ARE RABBITS MOST ACTIVE?
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A. Rabbits usually spend their entire lives in an area of 10 acres or less. If an area doesn’t provide enough food or cover, the rabbit will usually relocate. Rabbits are active year-round.

Most rabbits only live for about a year, though they make the most of their short lives as far as reproduction goes. A female rabbit can produce up to six litters in one year. First litters of the year may be born around March or April, and the farther north in the U.S. that a rabbit lives, the more litters a rabbit will have. A rabbit is only pregnant for about a month, and she’s usually impregnated again shortly thereafter, hence the term, “Breeding like rabbits.” Rabbits could probably breed up to 10 times a year if their populations weren’t limited by hunters, cars, weather and disease. Typical rabbit litters range from three to five young.

Baby rabbits look fairly helpless with closed eyes and no fur, but it only takes a couple short weeks before they are ready to leave the nest and be independent.

Q-3. WHAT FOODS DO RABBITS EAT?
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A. Rabbits are hungry herbivores. In the spring and summer months, rabbits have a huge appetite for vegetables and flowers. Woody plants are a favorite staple for rabbits in the colder months. And don’t think if you don’t have carrots in your garden, you’re safe. Bugs Bunny may have always been munching on one of those bright-orange veggies, but rabbits like most any and all crops. In fact, the only crops rabbits seem to leave alone on a regular basis are corn, squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoes and some kinds of peppers.

Q-4. WHY SHOULD I LEARN HOW TO GET RID OF RABBITS IN MY YARD, FIELDS OR CROPS?
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A. Once rabbits get cozy in your yard or fields, they can make a mess and cause a lot of damage that can cost thousands of dollars to fix. They will also return year after year, using your property as a home base — rabbits have no problem living alongside humans.

If a rabbit should choose to die near or under your home or business, the dead-rabbit odor can emanate into the living quarters, causing headaches and nausea.

The rabbit’s telltale round droppings are a good sign that a rabbit has been lurking on your property. Rabbit waste can spread disease, and small children who don’t know what they are finding in the yard are at especially high risk.

All these rabbit pest problems will affect the value of your property. It is difficult to sell a home that has a rabbit infestation and actually, it’s required by law that you fix the rabbit problem before you sell your home. Property value can decrease between five percent and ten percent due to rabbit problems.

Q-5. I HAVE A RABBIT IN MY YARD, FIELDS OR CROPS. WILL IT CAUSE ANY DAMAGE?
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A. Gardeners, homeowners and farmers may have very little good to say about fuzzy, cute bunnies. If you have a rabbit eating your vegetables and plants, you are not alone. Any time of year, rabbits can do a large amount of damage to plants, veggies, trees, shrubs and flowers.

If you grow tulips in your yard, rabbits may come calling. Rabbits love tulips, especially the first shoots that pop up in early spring. If a rabbit gnaws on this first tulip shoot, it’s not likely that the plant will survive to see next year. As far as veggies go, rabbits have the ability to level your crops of beets, beans and peas.

Rabbits can also cause considerable damage for woody plants in your yard. By clipping off branches, stems and buds and gnawing on bark, rabbits may be ruining your trees. When snow is on the ground during winter, rabbits will often chew ornamentals and trees to such an extent above the snowline that the plant will be dead by spring. Only some serious grafting intervention may save the plant at this point.

Orchards are not exempt from rabbit nuisance concerns, either. Rabbits love to chew on apple, cherry, plum and nut trees. Rose bushes and any berry bushes are also a favorite rabbit food. Rabbits have been credited with extensive sugarcane damage in Florida, wiping out whole crops and causing farmers to lose oodles of money.

If rabbits chew on your trees, often the wounds will attract insects, porcupines and woodpeckers. Diseases and wood-decaying organisms will find their way into the tree through the rabbit wound, which can eventually lead to decay and death of the trees in your yard.

Q-6. I HAVE A RABBIT IN MY CAR. WILL IT CAUSE ANY DAMAGE?
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A. Rabbits are definitely attracted to the engine compartment of cars, and it is thought that they confuse the wiring in trucks, cars and farm equipment with field grasses. This rabbit chewing can cause thousands of dollars in damage and render your vehicle’s electrical system useless.

Q-7. I HEARD RABBITS CARRY DISEASES. IS THAT TRUE?
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A. Rabbits are primary carriers of tick fever, tularemia, powassan virus and rabies.

Tularemia is an infectious disease in rabbits that is caused by bacteria. Humans contract tularemia when broken skin comes into contact with an infected rabbit carcass. Also, if a rabbit has been depositing fecal matter into your soil, you may contract tularemia while gardening or spending time in your yard. People with tularemiawill develop an ulcer at the site of infection, and lymph glands can become inflamed and swollen. Then, a fever can develop which may last longer than one month.

Tick fever is a virus that results in a fever, chills, headache, eye pain, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. Tick fever can be a severe illness, especially in children and the elderly.

Powassan virus can cause severe encephalitis in humans and has up to a 60 percent fatality rate. Infected humans may experience sleepiness, disorientation and become semicomatose.

Rabies, a virus, progressively paralyzes and can kill any mammal, including humans. Rabies is generally contracted through contact with an infected rabbit through biting. Though humans should avoid contact with any rabbits, if a rabbit seems especially fearless around humans, it could be infected. Call United Wildlife rabbit control immediately for professional rabbit removal.

Q-8. I HEARD INSECTS LIVE ON RABBITS. IS THAT TRUE?
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A. Rabbits are heavily infested with pests which can spread into your home or business searching for hosts. Ticks, fleas and mites are all known carriers of disease.

Several cases of mites biting humans indoors have been reported.

Ticks are very mobile and have been known to crawl into buildings that rabbits are living in, and travel great distances to attach themselves to people.

If a rabbit brings fleas into your home, most likely the biting bug will hop onto your housepet’s back. Once inside, large flea populations can build up quickly. Fleas live on the outside of their hosts’ bodies and need to feed on blood in order to produce eggs.

A bug living on a rabbit on your property can become an infestation in your pantry or carpet in no time. One or two mites may stray from the rabbit home and crawl along your kitchen table. But if the rabbit abandons its home for any reason, the whole caboodle of rabbit bugs will enter your home, looking for a new host. This is why it’s especially important to have our rabbit control experts remove rabbit homes and debris after all the rabbits have been removed.

Rabbits are a liability for businesses and restaurants. Rabbit bugs may infect your employees, guests or food. There are documented cases of illnesses occurring in these situations, and the plaintiff successfully sues the owner of the business. Also, if you are an employer and your workers’ environment is being contaminated by rabbits, you will see a drop in productivity due to illness. Remember, United Wildlife’s rabbit pest control experts can eradicate and manage a pest infestation brought in by a rabbit.

Q-9. WILL A RABBIT HURT MY DOG OR CAT?
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A. Because of illnesses and insects, a rabbit living in your yard, field or crops can pose a danger to house pets.

Q-10. I WANT TO TRAP OR KILL A RABBIT MYSELF. IS THAT OK?
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A. We understand the desire to take care of a rabbit problem yourself. It may be tempting to take matters into your own hands, but in the long run you could put yourself, your family and your home at risk of damage, distress and disease.

Shooting is not a good option to get rid of rabbits. The rabbit removal experts at United Wildlife will humanely trap any existing rabbits, and then offer rabbit prevention ideas and techniques. 

A homeowner may successfully trap and kill an adult rabbit, only to smell the nasty odor of baby rabbit carcasses rotting near the house or business. It can take between one and two years, depending on the size, for a rabbit’s body to decompose, and even longer for the odor to dissipate. Along with decomposing bodies come maggots and other bugs, including fly larvae.

Q-11. HOW CAN UNITED WILDLIFE’S RABBIT PEST CONTROL HELP ME GET RID OF MY RABBIT PROBLEM?
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A. United Wildlife’s specialty is the removal of rabbits from yards, fields and crops through special rabbit trapping techniques, rabbit repellents, rabbit poisons and use of fiber-optic and infrared cameras. Depending on city, county, federal and state law, the rabbit will either be relocated or euthanized once it is taken away. No matter the course of action, the rabbit will be treated in a humane manner.

United Wildlife’s rabbit trappers use a variety of rabbit live traps, kill traps, body-gripping traps and snares, depending on the kind of rabbit infestation and federal, county and state laws.

If a rabbit has already died near your home or business, our professional rabbit trappers offer dead rabbit removal services and can also help clear odors caused by dead rabbits.

We’re professional rabbit trappers who will travel to any location to get the rabbits out.  We also do professional phone and Internet coaching for those who live in remote areas and who want to perform pest control for rabbits by using digital pictures sent by e-mail. We can also ship traps and equipment to help you trap rabbits yourself the right way. Either way, we will work with you to solve your rabbit invasion. There is not a rabbit problem that can’t be solved with United Wildlife’s professional rabbit trapping service.

Q-12. WHAT ARE UNITED WILDLIFE’S PAYMENT OPTIONS FOR RABBIT REMOVAL OR TO GET RID OF RABBITS?
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A. Call United Wildlife’s rabbit trapping specialists and we’ll give you our rates. We charge incrementally per rabbit, number of service calls and time spent on project. Prices will vary depending on severity of the rabbit problem. Depending on the amount of rabbits and where they are living, you may be able to assist us with the rabbit problem as we are dealing with it. There is no free government service that takes care of rabbit control. The good news is, insurance companies will often pay for some, if not all, of the costs incurred to get rid of rabbits.

United Wildlife rabbit experts accept Visa, MasterCard and American Express. We also take purchase orders and cash.

Q-13. WHAT SHOULD I DO AFTER UNITED WILDLIFE ANIMAL CONTROL REMOVES THE RABBITS?
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A. After our rabbit removal experts have taken care of the rabbit problem, we will also help you make sure your property is secure to prevent any furry friends from entering and grazing in the future.

United Wildlife’s rabbit blockers can install special products which block rabbits from entering your yard or fields, and to keep rabbits from grazing on your property. Slick fences and other barriers can be used to prevent rabbits from even stepping a foot onto your property.
 
Cleaning up rabbit droppings is crucial in the rabbit prevention process. If you leave any rabbit waste behind, it will entice other rabbits to come make a home in your house or business. United Wildlife can help with yard decontamination and rabbit odor control needs.

Do remember that rabbits are wild and unpredictable. Though we have years of experience in the rabbit removal field, a particular rabbit situation may require that we return more than once to get the job done right and to prevent rabbits near your house or business in the future. Incremental pricing will apply for our professional rabbit removal and all rabbit solutions are custom-made and custom-priced.

Our mission at United Wildlife is to help identify your rabbit pest damage. We will remove the existing rabbit pest and develop a custom wildlife solution to stop or control the rabbit problem from occurring again.

In the end, if you’re happy with our experienced, professional animal control, any referrals are always appreciated.



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